Beetroot and Carrot Soup

2 Leeks

4 large carrots

1 large beetroot

1 litre water

1 tsp pink salt

1 tsp turmeric

1/2 tsp paprika

1/4 tsp black pepper

1 tsp chia seeds

Brown the leeks in a tablespoon of avocado oil.

Peel and chop the carrots.

Peel and dice the beetroot.

Add the carrot and beet into the pan.

Cook slow and low for five minutes.

Add in the water and seasoning.

Bring to the boil and simmer for fifteen minutes.

Allow to cool slightly and pour into a blender.

Pour into bowls and sprinkle with chia seeds.

20170308_125957.jpg

Advertisements

Are you B12 deficient?

Don’t Ignore These 7 Warning Signs of Vitamin B12 Deficiency!

B12 is a wonder vitamin. It’s a wonder what we’d do without it! Actually, its one that a deficiency of will get us into a bit of a mess.

The thing with being B12 deficient is that a lot of the symptoms can be mistaken for something else and not recognised. Fatigue: it’s just tiredness; I’ve been busy. Ache and pain: it’s the time of year, everyone is a bit achy. Dizziness: I’m hungry or have low blood sugar; I’ll eat some carbs!

Ringing any bells?

Finally, some Chronic Fatigue Syndrome research to get behind.

At last, a good start on research for CFS/ME as a physical condition. We are farther away from a belief it is ‘all in our minds’ and the ‘yuppy flu’ days, but not far enough. There is still too much myth surrounding CFS/ME. Lets hope this research continues and gets the respect it needs.

This article is well worth a read. Feel free to share. Lets get the word out there and encourage more research to be undertaken and published.

http://www.treehugger.com/health/study-likens-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-hibernation.html

Know your sugars

One of the first thing I talk to people about when discussing managing fatigue is cut sugar right back. It’s hard to go sugar free, but not impossible. But cutting sugar is a good way to begin.  This is all very well if you know what sugar is. I tell people to read the labels and then I give them a list of the most common disguises sugar uses to sneak into your food.

The following article, from a trusted research source, plainly and excellently lays out the sugars to watch out for.

Well worth a read. Carry a note of the common and uncommon ones in your purse or wallet when you go shopping. Stop letting food manufacturers poison you!

Butter me up!

I bloomin’ love nut butters. I love them in stuff, on stuff or straight off the spoon.

Nuts and nut butters are a great go-to snack option for anyone trying to manage fatigue or blood sugar levels. So for effective management of chronic fatigue or diabetes, these should be in your cupboards and handbags/pockets (maybe just the nuts in your pockets, it could get a bit sticky with the butters).

I recently discovered walnut butter and used that in energy balls. It made a denser ball and was less sweet than almond or cashew butter but was still yummy. Here is a link to an easy peasy do it yourself nut butter recipe (or seed butter if you prefer). It can also be found in an article on nuts but I thought I’d post is separately as I didn’t want you to miss out.

Homemade Nut & Seed Butter

 

The real M.E.

I class myself as a recovering fatigue. I’ve had some really tough times but I see the sun at the end of my tunnel shining and encouraging me on. Chronic illness can be self absorbing. Yes you must prioritise yourself but you can still be there for other people and it will do you good to do that. I appreciate the light but I have fought to see it. Don’t hide in your darkness. Accept help, don’t be afraid to ask for it, but also support and help where you can too. It’s how the world goes round best.14333129_686586391490310_6914153998707452042_n

Essential oil in food and drink

I recently attended a doTERRA talk and was fascinated to learn about ingesting essential oils. I know there is debate about ingesting essential oils. It is safe if you GET THE RIGHT ONES so don’t do downing the cheapy ones off a hippy website. I bought the physician kit from doTERRA and dabbled half-heartedly with a few oils, not really wanting to expend my much needed energy on a new thing which may be a fad (for me, not generally). I think we’ve all dabbled with lavendar if nothing else. Yesterday, I hit a fatigue slump and needed to prep for work in the evening, so I rubbed a drop of peppermint oil on the back of my neck and inhaled it from my hands. Instant lift that lasted!

This week I’ve been listening to the Essential Oils summit who have fascinating talks daily. I think it’s too late to sign up but have a look at superfoodalchemy.com and traditionalcookingschool.com. I listened to Wardeh’s talk today (tradcookingschool). I happened to be in the kitchen with my laptop and was making a fruit tea, so I popped a drop of lemon oil and a drop of wild orange in it. Mega-yum! Energy boost! I also happened to be making a pasta sauce and rather than the herb, I popped a drop of oregano oil in (this oil is strong so you may want to drop it off of a cocktail stick but I like oregano). Wardeh says that a drop is equivalent to a teaspoon of the herb so that will give you an idea of how much to use akin to your own tastebuds. The sauce tastes amazing, plus, oregano is good for gut issues and I know my husband is having a stress work day which will inevitably upset his bowels, so I am hopeful his dinner will help sort that out. I am now getting really enthusiastic. Ever since I wrote Eating for Energy a few months ago, people have been asking about a second book. I never intended to write one, I just wanted to get how I improved my chronic fatigue condition with food out there to help other people. Now though I am getting excited about cooking and baking with essential oils…maybe there is a second book in the offing!

Palmed off by unsupported facts about a ‘healthy’ sugar.

Bum. Yesterday I thought I’d found a new sugar that wasn’t going to exacerbate my fatigue coconut sugar (or coconut palm sugar/coconut nectar). Frankly, I should have known better. I bought some coconut jam at the weekend. I spread it on a piece of toasted rye bread yesterday morning. Had I stopped at that, I might have got away with it. But I didn’t, and I didn’t. Believing it to be low GI and having nutritional benefits such as magnesium (great for fatiguers) I ate a couple of teaspoonfuls of it after my dinner. I work evenings teaching Pilates. I felt dreadful at my classes last night. Nauseous and knackered. I blamed the heat, of course, but a little voice was saying, Yeah, what did you eat that was different today? Coconut jam. So, referring to my nutrition bible Authority Nutrition (should have gone there in the first place) I now find it is loaded with sucralose, so I may as well be eating fructose, so I may as well be downing refined sugar. It’s not as bad as refined sugar. But it’s not a ‘good’ sugar. Let’s face it, that is probably never going to exist. I can obviously tolerate a bit, which is progress in itself. Several years ago, when my CFS was much worse, it would have increased my fatigue and sent me straight into a slump, because that’s what sugar does to anyone with a fatigue condition. But I think, in the interest of continued CFS recovery, it’s bye bye coconut jam. Back to Avocado on toast and banana in my porridge for breakfast. Anyway, my chia seed jam is much better (she convinces self). The link for the article is below.

https://authoritynutrition.com/coconut-sugar

We’re jammin’

Mmmm. Toasted coconut and cranberry rye bread (Biona Organic brand) for lunch. Topped it with blackberry chia seed jam. You can use any berry or a combo. Great way of using up a glut of fruit or those berries languishing in the bottom of the fridge! Sugar free but still mega yummy and sweet. The recipe is in my book Eating for Energy (link on the side of the page) but here you go:

1 cup of frozen or unfrozen berries such as strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries (if using unfrozen fruit watch it doesn’t catch and burn, frozen is preferable)

1.5 tbsp chia seeds

1-2 teaspoons of lemon or lime juice (lime works very well with raspberries)

1 teaspoon of brown rice syrup or a drop or two of liquid stevia.

 Cook the fruit slow and low.

Mush it down with a wooden spoon or fork.

Stir in the sweetener and juice.

Remove from heat and stir in the chia seeds.

Pop into a small kilner jar and let cool then store in the fridge for up to a week (if you can make it last that long).