Get Real

And yet another great article from my fave nutrition research peeps advocating real food.

So quit the s**t people and read on for useful info that you should inwardly digest.

If you are looking to cut your sugar intake, maintain blood sugar levels or manage diabetes, or just eat more healthily, this article is for you.

https://authoritynutrition.com/21-reasons-to-eat-real-food/

Know your sugars

One of the first thing I talk to people about when discussing managing fatigue is cut sugar right back. It’s hard to go sugar free, but not impossible. But cutting sugar is a good way to begin.  This is all very well if you know what sugar is. I tell people to read the labels and then I give them a list of the most common disguises sugar uses to sneak into your food.

The following article, from a trusted research source, plainly and excellently lays out the sugars to watch out for.

Well worth a read. Carry a note of the common and uncommon ones in your purse or wallet when you go shopping. Stop letting food manufacturers poison you!

Palmed off by unsupported facts about a ‘healthy’ sugar.

Bum. Yesterday I thought I’d found a new sugar that wasn’t going to exacerbate my fatigue coconut sugar (or coconut palm sugar/coconut nectar). Frankly, I should have known better. I bought some coconut jam at the weekend. I spread it on a piece of toasted rye bread yesterday morning. Had I stopped at that, I might have got away with it. But I didn’t, and I didn’t. Believing it to be low GI and having nutritional benefits such as magnesium (great for fatiguers) I ate a couple of teaspoonfuls of it after my dinner. I work evenings teaching Pilates. I felt dreadful at my classes last night. Nauseous and knackered. I blamed the heat, of course, but a little voice was saying, Yeah, what did you eat that was different today? Coconut jam. So, referring to my nutrition bible Authority Nutrition (should have gone there in the first place) I now find it is loaded with sucralose, so I may as well be eating fructose, so I may as well be downing refined sugar. It’s not as bad as refined sugar. But it’s not a ‘good’ sugar. Let’s face it, that is probably never going to exist. I can obviously tolerate a bit, which is progress in itself. Several years ago, when my CFS was much worse, it would have increased my fatigue and sent me straight into a slump, because that’s what sugar does to anyone with a fatigue condition. But I think, in the interest of continued CFS recovery, it’s bye bye coconut jam. Back to Avocado on toast and banana in my porridge for breakfast. Anyway, my chia seed jam is much better (she convinces self). The link for the article is below.

https://authoritynutrition.com/coconut-sugar

In a bit of a jam

20160823_100939

It’s official. I’m in a bit of a jam. Had this sugar-free fantastic jar of lusciousness for brekkie on some gorgeous toasted coconut and cranberry rye bread, then took to eating it straight from the jar. I fear addiction. I have had to forcibly remove myself from the kitchen (and I left kicking and screaming). Send help. I may need therapy.

Excuse me, I think I left something on the hob in the kitchen…what do you mean put that spoon down? What spoon? (Hides spoon up sleeve.)

We’re jammin’

Mmmm. Toasted coconut and cranberry rye bread (Biona Organic brand) for lunch. Topped it with blackberry chia seed jam. You can use any berry or a combo. Great way of using up a glut of fruit or those berries languishing in the bottom of the fridge! Sugar free but still mega yummy and sweet. The recipe is in my book Eating for Energy (link on the side of the page) but here you go:

1 cup of frozen or unfrozen berries such as strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries (if using unfrozen fruit watch it doesn’t catch and burn, frozen is preferable)

1.5 tbsp chia seeds

1-2 teaspoons of lemon or lime juice (lime works very well with raspberries)

1 teaspoon of brown rice syrup or a drop or two of liquid stevia.

 Cook the fruit slow and low.

Mush it down with a wooden spoon or fork.

Stir in the sweetener and juice.

Remove from heat and stir in the chia seeds.

Pop into a small kilner jar and let cool then store in the fridge for up to a week (if you can make it last that long).

 

Sugar and spice, nasty and nice

Sometimes I think I crave sugar. I may, but I can’t. In the old days I would load up on sugar or carbs in the hope it would give me energy. Loads of fatigue-y people make this all too common mistake. Sugar for CFS people is a huge no-no. It causes a massive slump. So I’ve learned that when  want sugar it’s usually because I’m beginning to feel fatigued. Today I had a huge bowl of fruit salad; juicy nectarine, grapes, galia melon and sweet strawberries. So much more beneficial than any sugary treat. I have also learned to add cinnamon, a useful sweet spice. Goes with anything. Try it.

Incredible hulk supper

I sometimes crave green. Usually either a large leafy salad or kale chips. I love kale chips. I could live on kale chips. I think you get my gist. Sooooo easy – bung half a bag of kale on a baking tray, sprinkle rock or pink salt and cracked black pepper and drizzle with a nut oil. Bake until they crisp. Eat. I added halloumi today. Can’t beat a bit of squeaky cheese on a Saturday night, or any night (maybe I need to get out more). Kale is an excellent source of vitamins A, C and K, and a good source of calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium. Magnesium is essential in dealing with fatigue.